Posts Tagged ‘character’

just written

 

I stumbled upon an article while browsing for tips and tricks on writing, and thought it was really helpful. Writing can be intimidating, especially with a first draft. It’s so overwhelming, and hard to decide where to start. Some writers argue that you should start at the end of the novel. Some argue that you should begin with crafting your characters. I’m sort of in that place right now where I’m stuck with my writing, and this lays out a customizable formula for how to write your novel.

 

Here it is if you want to check it out!

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I did my last post about starting a bucket list.

So I started.

My goal was to have 100 items on the list. I’m going to post #1-45, seeing as I’m not finished. I’m thinking maybe some of the things I wrote will give you guys some ideas. Continue to give me suggestion to add to my list!

 

Bucket List

1. Make a short film.
2. Write a novel.
3. Stay overnight in a haunted house/hotel.
4. Attend a Hollywood movie premiere.
5. Go on stage at a rock concert.
6. Donate at least $1,000 to a charitable organization.
7. Ride in a hot air balloon.
8. Drive on the Autobahn.
9. Get an actor to introduce himself/herself to you as a character they have played.
10. Go whitewater rafting.
11. Leave a $250 tip for a waiter/waitress.
12. Eat at least one meal in every state.
13. Be an elementary school teacher for a day.
14. Eat pizza in Italy.
15. Be on Ellen.
16. Donate 100 blankets to the homeless.
17. Go to Times Square for New Year’s Eve
18. Pay for a family’s meal in a restaurant.
19. Be a bridesmaid.
20. Throw a dart at a map and travel where it lands.
21. Stay overnight in an abandoned asylum/prison.
22. Go to a Superbowl.
23. Live in another country for at least 6 months.
24. Take a picture every day for a year.
25. Go to a “coffee shop” in Amsterdam.
26. Go on a cruise.
27. Visit at least 5 European countries.
28. Make a scrapbook.
29. Go to Comic-Con.
30. Befriend a complete stranger.
31. Play with a baby cheetah.
32. Go scuba diving.
33. See the 7 wonders of the world.
34. Go to Mardi Gras.
35. Drive a Lamborghini.
36. Hold a snake.
37. Go to Buckingham Palace.
38. Do a pub crawl in Ireland.
39. Take a tour of Alcatraz.
40. Ride a gondola in Venice, Italy.
41. Drink at an ice bar.
42. Pull an all-nighter in Las Vegas.
43. Write a letter to myself and open it in 10 years.
44. Learn to play poker.
45. Learn how to ice skate.

What makes a horror movie? Is it a charismatic protagonist that everyone is rooting for? Is it an iconic villain like Jason Voorhees, Freddy Krueger or Michael Myers? Is it the suspenseful music that floods the speakers as the villain approaches? (I know you’re humming the theme for Jaws as you read this.) Are the reality based horror films that are the most frightening? Or are the supernatural monster movies the most horrifying? Is it the film’s ability to produce genuine fear in the audience? (Do you guys agree with this list? Top 50 Scariest Horror Movies of All Time.)

In my opinion, horror movies are typically a hit or miss. I usually don’t feel neutral toward horror films; I either really enjoy them or really hate them. I have a hard time identifying what it is that makes a horror movie worth watching. Obviously an interesting, well-executed plot is important. Horror movies have a reputation for being predictable and repetitive. There are only so many times we can watch a group of obnoxious teenagers get hacked up one by one, while on an overnight camping trip. However, when you get a horror movie with a never-before-seen storyline and an exciting ending, it really works. Acting is important in all films, but I think it’s somewhat difficult to give a convincing performance in a horror movie. Conveying genuine fear in a staged situation often comes off as fake and off-putting. Playing a deranged, psychotic killer can either come off as unconvincing or too exaggerated.

As horror films developed throughout the 20th century, viewers were given a bounty of horror films that have achieved status as cult classics. Films like Tod Browning‘s Dracula (1931), Alfred Hitchcock‘s Psycho (1960), Tobe Hooper‘s The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974), and George A. Romero‘s Night of the Living Dead (1964) are all milestones in the evolution of the the horror film.

dracula1931psychonight of the living deadtcsm poster

Most often, it takes time before movies are considered classics. Looking back, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, at the time of its release, was probably not iconic. However, after countless remakes and global recognition of the film’s antagonist, Leatherface (a name given to the character by fans of the franchise), I think it’s safe to say that this film is a classic. While we’re only in 2014, it seems like 21st century horror does not provide us with as many films that have the potential to be, one day, considered classics. It sincerely saddens me that Sharknado (2013) is as widely recognized as it is, however I find solace in the fact that its claim to fame is just how truly terrible the film is.

There have been a few films released this century that are either well on their way to reaching the status of cult classic, or have the potential to do so. The Paranormal Activity film series has been wildly popular since its release, prompting 4 sequels (most recently Paranormal Activity: The Marked Ones). From filmmaker Oren Peli, the first film in the series was made on a budget of next to nothing. Filmed with handheld cameras giving the appearance of home footage, the film was released into select theaters after generating some buzz at film festivals. Having five films with a continuing storyline in the horror genre is fairly uncommon. These films are also pretty exceptional with the fact that none of these sequels have been largely disappointing for fans.

MV5BOTE2OTk4MTQzNV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwODUxOTM3OQ@@._V1_SY317_CR6,0,214,317_AL_ insidious conjuring

Another horror film that I am particularly fond of is Insidious. Starring Patrick Wilson (I am mildly obsessed with him) and Rose Byrne, Insidious was released in 2010, and the second installment of the series, Insidious: Chapter 2, was released in 2013. The expected release of the 3rd film is April 2015. This film definitely had an original storyline (you can watch the trailer here) . There were just enough moments of comic relief, and I have nothing but positive things to say about the actors. The convincing performances of the actors in Insidious were precisely why I was very excited to see that Patrick Wilson had signed on to play Ed Warren, alongside Vera Farmiga (another one of my favorite actresses) in The Conjuring. This film is also one of the best that I’ve seen in a while. Here’s the trailer for it. Anyone else who also enjoyed The Conjuring will be happy to know that Wilson and Farmiga have signed on for a second installment of the film.

So I have, in this post and a few others, told you guys a few of the horror films that I really enjoy. My point for this post is that I really want to know what you all think makes a horror movie? What is it about the film that makes people want to watch it? What makes a horror cult classic? Please leave some of your insight in a comment below!

I added a poll with just a couple answers, but feel free to add your own. I want to know what you think!